BOXES, COIN COLLECTING
Overview (PREPAYMENT)


Overview

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 1 and No. 1A
These were introduced just as the National Telephone company merged with the GPO in 1912.  The GPO modified the box slightly and it finally became the Box, Coin Collecting No. 1.  This was a flimsy box and could be forced open easily, so armoured cash boxes were installed positioned under the case.  Secured with a Key, Lock A.

Made by L. M. Ericsson of Sweden their product number 441 (Catalogue 1902).  These were normally produced with the Ericsson trade mark on the casing front, but the boxes supplied to the GPO had the Royal Cipher printed on them or a plate with the cipher fixed over the original trade mark.

The BCC No. 1A is used where a large cash compartment is required.  This unit comes with fixing screws, a Baseboard No. 5 and a Box, Cash No. 1A.  Secured with a Key, Lock A.

These boxes were used with a Telephone No. 1 in CB areas or a Telephone No. 3 or No. 11 in LB/Magneto areas.

This coin box was connected to an ordinary telephone instrument and the operator at the exchange completes the connection and then asks the caller to pay.

For more information on the BCC No. 1 click here
 

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 4
This coin box is used with table telephones on PBX circuits.  The lock and key are provided by the subscriber.  The unit comes complete with Baseboard and a Buzzer No. 6.
 

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 6
This coin box is used with wall telephones on PBX circuits.  The lock and key are provided by the subscriber.  The unit comes with fixing screws, a Box, Cash No. 4 and a Buzzer No. 6.


Box, Coin Collecting  No. 7
This coin box is used in call offices and subscribers premises where a large cash box is required.  Secured with a Key, Lock A.  The unit includes a Baseboard No. 6 and a Box, Cash 1A.  Supersedes the BCC No. 1A.


Box, Coin Collecting  No. 10
This coin box is used in Automatic Exchange areas and is similar to the BCC No. 1A, but with veeder cyclic meter and window in door.  Secured with a Key, Lock D.  The unit comes fixing screws, a Baseboard No. 5 and a Box, Cash No. 1. 
 

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 13
The Box, Coin Collecting No. 13 was the original A&B coin mechanism and was introduced in 1924's.  Around the mid 1930's the Boxes, Coin Collecting No's 14, 16 and 17 were introduced and these were the second generation of the A&B model.  These were prepayment boxes.

These were made by Hall Telephone Accessories Ltd and each mechanism could accommodate four coin slots, although the GPO only used a maximum of three.

The main differences were that the BCC No.13 had a Bell Receiver and the Mechanism No. 13 connected via large plunger style connectors.  This setup was known as the Telephone No. 115 (CB), Telephone No. 119 (automatic) or Telephone No. 123 (Automatic).  All these used a Bellset No. 1 which was located outside the Coin Box.

A Box, Coin Collecting No. 13G as also used in areas where unscrupulous people blocked up the reject chute.  This had a modified lower font which was glazed so that any blockages in the reject chute could be seen by the user.

The mechanisms worked on the following principle.  The handset was lifted and pennies inserted into the coin slot (if cash is not inserted the dial will not function except for digit 0).  The full weight of the pennies required operated a switch which allowed the dial to be used, but prevented speaking.  On answer, the caller pressed Button A and this caused the coins drop into the cash container and the switch was released which allowed a two way conversation.  On no answer or busy the caller would press Button B and the money deposited would be returned via the reject shute.

On calls that required Sixpences or Shillings the caller would firstly dial 0 for the operator.  The operator would connect the call and on answer ask the caller to deposit coins.  On inserting the coins they hit a gong which has a transmitter attached to it that induces an audible signal on the line.  Two different coins produced two types of audible signal.  In this way the operator would know what type of coin was inserted and how many.  The operator could cut in during the call and ask for more coins to be deposited for the call to be continued.

For more information on the BCC No. 13 click here
 

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 14
Introduced in 1930, the Box, Coin Collecting No. 14 used the Box, Coin Collecting No. 13 casings, but was fitted with the Mechanism No. 14, which had a completely different style of connector (see picture below).  Originally, this collection box would have been used in Kiosks with a Telephone No. 131 in Automatic areas.  From 1933 the Telephone No. 131 was replaced with a Telephone No. 218 and Bellset No. 30.

Operation was in principle similar to the No. 13.

The Box, Coin Collecting No. 14A was introduced in 1930 for use in subscriber premises.  These used a Telephone No. 131 or a Telephone No. 182 and Bellset No. 24.  From 1933 these used the Telephone No. 218 on a wall bracket.

The year 1935 saw the introduction of the Box, Coin Collecting No. 14D, for telephone kiosks, which was used until the introduction of the 700 type payphones.  This box was used with a Telephone No. 238 (automatic areas) or No. 242 (CB areas) fitted on top of the left hand shelf.  An internal Bellset was also fitted, making the installation self contained.  For subscriber installations the Box, Coin Collecting No. 14E was used with same telephones except these were fitted on a metal wall bracket.

The Box, Coin Collecting No. 14G as also used in kiosk areas where unscrupulous people blocked up the reject chute.  This had a modified lower front which was glazed so that any blockages could be seen by the user.

Some BCC No. 14 and 16 were fitted with a cover over the coin slots called a Hood, Coin Slot, No. 1.  This was to stop the malicious insertion of foreign objects into the coin slots.

These were made by Hall Telephone Accessories Ltd. and could be seen in use until the late 1970's, when most exchanges were fitted with the coin feed and check relays sets required by the 700 model pay phones.

Mechanisms were decimalised in 1971 to accept the new 2p and 10p coins.

More information on the BCC No. 14 click here
 

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 16
These were introduced in 1933 in Magneto and CBS 1, 2 and 3 areas.  This used a shortened casing and had no A or B button as the calls were always operator controlled.  Originally fitted with a Telephone No. 190, this was superseded with the Telephone No. 196, which was used with an external Bellset No. 21, 29 or 31. 

The Box, Coin Collecting No. 16A was introduced in 1933 and this was used in Subscribers premises.

In 1935 the Box, Coin Collecting No. 16B superseded the Box, Coin Collecting No. 16 and used the full height case.  This allowed for an integral Bellset.  In the same year the Box, Coin Collecting No. 16C superseded the Box, Coin Collecting No. 16A and used the standard subscribers case, which also accepted an internal bellset.

More information on the BCC No. 16 click here
 

Box, Coin Collecting  No. 17
Two models of the Box, Coin Collecting No. 14 were introduced in 1949 as a trial and it not known if any were generally installed.  The differences were that the coin mechanism (Mechanism No. 17) had a flexible cord that connected to the Bellset, which allowed mechanism to be swung out for maintenance whilst remaining operational.  Box, Coin Collecting No. 17 replaced the Box, Coin Collecting No. 14D and the Box, Coin Collecting No. 17A replaced the Box, Coin Collecting No. 14E.

More information on the BCC No. 17 click here

 

 
 
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Last revised: March 29, 2021

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