BELLS


 

ADJUSTING AC BELLS
ADJUSTING DC BELLS
BELL No. 1A
BELL No. 2A
BELL No. 3A
BELL No. 4A
BELL No. 5
BELL No. 9A
BELL No. 13
BELL No. 15A
BELL No. 16A
BELL No. 17
BELL No. 19A
BELL No. 20
BELL No. 25
BELL No. 26
BELL No. 27
BELL No. 28
BELL No. 29
BELL No. 30
BELL No. 31
BELL No. 32
BELL No. 33
BELL No. 34
BELL No. 35
BELL No. 36
BELL No. 37
BELL No. 38
BELL No. 39
BELL No. 40
BELL No. 41
BELL No. 42
BELL No. 43A
BELL No. 44
BELL No. 45
BELL No. 46
BELL No. 47A
BELL No. 48
BELL No. 53A
BELL No. 55
BELL No. 56
BELL No. 57
BELL No. 59
BELL No. 60A
BELL No. 62
BELL No. 64D
BELL No. 64E
BELL No. 64F
BELL No. 65A
BELL No. 66A
BELL No. 67
BELL No. 69A
BELL No. 70A
BELL No. 74
BELL No. 75
BELL No. 76
BELL No. 78A
BELL No. 79
BELL No. 80A/B/D
BELL No. 81A-1
BELL No. 83A-1

   

 

This section contains information on basic bells.  Bells that have associated components within them i.e. Induction Coils, are called Bellsets.

Click here for the Bellset Menu.


For the non-technical.......
Bells come in two types, AC (alternating Current) and DC (Direct Current).

The main difference is the bell ringing mechanism.  AC bells just have two coils, whilst DC bells have one coil and a contact set on the bell clapper arm.

In telephony, DC bells require power, i.e. batteries or a power supply. 

Most AC bells will work on a telephone line if wired correctly.

 
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Last revised: May 15, 2020

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