The Street Pillar


Before the 1970's the local cable distribution would be fed from a  Cabinet to Pillars, as shown on the right.  After the 1970's Pillars were dropped and Cabinets were just used as the main distribution mechanism. These Pillars would in turn terminate the cables which run to the Distribution Points (DP's), either on poles or building walls.

The Cabinets and Pillars afforded flexibility in the network as any incoming wire could be connected to any outgoing wire.  The connection made by a piece of two wire called a "jumper wire".  In the early Pillars and Cabinets the terminals were actually screws which clamped the jumper wire or in the case of a through connection (i.e. wire 10 to wire 10) then two metal pins were used (See picture to the right).

In the early 1970's the terminal blocks were replaced with plastic formers and the cable wires just pushed through numbered holes and left hanging.  Connection was made with crimps (See picture below).

The Pillar has four effective parts:-

  1. Base
  2. Terminal strip
  3. Moisture cover
  4. Outer cover

The base had a 90 degree pipe leading from it through which the incoming and out going cables were fed.  The cables were  pre-terminated on the terminal blocks and jointed to the local cables a small distance away.

Due to being out in the open, the wiring and terminal block were then covered with a metal moisture sleeve which had a rubber gasket at the bottom.  Desiccant was also left inside the Pillar.

The outer cover was then put in place and a long bolt went through the base, which secured the cover.

 
 
BACK Home page BT/GPO Telephones Search the Site Glossary of Telecom Terminology Quick Find All Telephone Systems

Last revised: December 29, 2010

FM2